Getting back into the swing of things…

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If you are like me then January is the “getting back on track” month after the Christmas season! I go through this every year. Sometimes it can be hard to re-implement the school day after it has been weeks of…well no school! Here are a few tips that have worked for me!

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Resume Regular Scheduled Programming:
Are you like me and have a homeschool day schedule that works great for you? I have worked very hard to create a day that will keep my kids eager and engaged! For our home it is very important to resume our regular day as soon as January begins! I have found in past years if I drift from the schedule Elias is used to it just adds more stress and drama!

A Lighter Load:
After resuming our schedule I do make a few changes for the first week or two in January.

For the first week I cut each subject in half, this works great! (example: instead of the regular 2 chapters in History we’ll do one. We will have 2 worksheets in Explode the Code rather than 4) Elias doesn’t feel overwhelmed and it helps revive routine!

I focus on non electronic subjects. I steer away from the iPad and computer for that first week! If your kids are anything like mine Christmas break involved more than their fair share of video games!

Electronic Free School Room:
This is VERY important for my family! It is too easy for preschoolers and a grade schooler to get distracted! We have a separate homeschool room in our house so it is easy for us to leave the iPad, cell phones, iPods, DS, ect upstairs! If you do not have a separate school room I would highly recommend an “electronics basket” large enough to keep all your family’s distracting electronics in! Then put the basket in your room…out of site out of mind!

I do have designated game times in our school day! DS time is only about 45 minutes in the whole school day (broken in to short game times) Obviously game time something that you have to decide for your family!

Limit Activities:
Limiting our outside the home activities is curtail for us in January! Our kids have been going going going since Thanksgiving and it is time for a slow down! In January we have two things outside the home…Homelink and AWANA!

Family Time:
Lastly, I think that ending the school day with family fun hour is so important! It doesn’t matter the game the location…just that you are doing it as a family! (example: today there is snow…a whole lot of snow…there a lot of fun out there just waiting for the end of the day!)

Please feel free to download my Homeschool Planner! I have gotten great feedback! It has really helped other moms on track!!

2012-2013 Curriculum!


Last week we started school…2nd grade….WHAT 2ND GRADE already!?!?!? I cannot believe how fast my little man is growing up!

Smile on his face for the 1st day of school {last monday} This boy loves to learn!!!

Here is a small over view of SOME of this years curriculum! There will be a larger more in-depth post with my thoughts of each book and why we selected what we selected coming soon! 🙂 Until then here are some of the books and the links to where you can find out more and order!!

Explode the Code’s child-drawn illustrations and easy, repetitive exercises provide a friendly learning experience. Progressively building up a store of phonics recognition, pronunciation and reading skills, your students will soon be on their way to acquiring beginning to intermediate reading skills. Explode the Code’s phonics workbooks contain exercises that guide students through matching, reading, spelling, writing, copying, and more. Easy, fun and proven, Explode the Code is a favorite with moms and kids!

The Story of the World is an award-winning resource for families looking for a history curriculum they can fall in love with. Told in the straightforward, engaging style that has become Susan Wise Bauer’s trademark, this four-volume set covers the sweep of human history from ancient times until the present. Africa, China, Europe, the Americas — find out what happened all around the world in long-ago times. This read-aloud series is designed for parents and teachers to share with elementary school children. Enjoy it together and introduce your child to the marvelous story of the the world’s civilizations.




Who is Fred?
Answer #1
In one of the Life of Fred books, Fred Gauss was born on the western slopes of the Siberian mountains. By the end of the final book, he is six years old.
In his everyday life he first encounters the need for each new part of mathematics, and then comes the mathematics.
Never again will students have to ask their perennial question: “When are we ever gonna use this stuff?”
Answer #2
Stan Schmidt, the author of the Life of Fred series, became a full-time high school teacher the month he turned 22.
In his first semester of teaching, Stan drew Fred on the blackboard.
It was just a brief appearance: Fred was going fishing.
Then Fred appeared in other examples, and soon became a regular part of the classroom experience. One student in metal shop made a Fred Gauss belt buckle and gave it to Stan.
When Stan switched to college teaching, Fred came along with him. Fred’s biography continued to develop.
After eleven years of college teaching, Stan “retired himself” to an A-frame on six acres in the woods outside of Santa Rosa, California—waiting to find out what God wanted him to do next.
Eighteen years later, now living in Reno, he began writing the Life of Fred series. Two hours each day, starting at 4 a.m., Stan and Fred work on the next book. To be more accurate it should be pointed out that technically, Stan is a co-author since Fred is very much involved. It takes a rambunctious, full of energy at four o’clock in the morning child to get the day rolling that early!

The reason we study math is so we can apply what we learn in everyday situations. The students learn their math facts, rules, and formulas, and are able to use this knowledge in real life applications. The study of math is much more than committing a list of facts to memory. It includes memorization, but it also encompasses learning the concepts that are critical to problem solving.

 Patterns of Nature consists of 30 lessons bound in an illustrated workbook. Science, at this level, mainly involves identification. Such subjects as seasons, seeds, wildflowers, weeds, trees, mammals, insects, songbirds, and the celestial bodies are introduced on the child’s level.



In addition we will also be involved in Soccer, Martial Arts, & Music Lessons…Plus there are some awesome field trips in the works!!

Smiles,
Britni